The Wisdoms Project


Relativity


Over the years, I’ve learned that how we see things….how we react to circumstances….how we think about something….is very dependent on where we are standing at the moment.  A lot of things don’t change, but a lot of things do.  It’s important to look down regularly to be sure that we are not standing in hardening cement.

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I think that nudity on-screen is disgusting, shameful and unpatriotic.  But if I was twenty-two and had a great body, it would be artistic, tasteful, patriotic and a progressive, religious experience.
Shelley Winters

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In 1917, I took a common urinal and turned it upside down, titled it “Fountain,” signed it and included it in an exhibition in New York City.  Now they admire it for its aesthetic beauty!
Marcel Duchamp

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If the only tool you have is a hammer,
every problem looks like a nail.
Abraham Maslow
 
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Excess on occasion is exhilarating.  
               It prevents moderation from acquiring the deadening effect of a habit.
W. Somerset Maugham

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If you owe the bank $100….that’s your problem.
If you owe the bank $100 million….that’s the banks problem.
J. Paul Getty
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How long is “just a minute?”
     Depends on what side of the bathroom door you’re on.

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Patience is something you greatly admire in the driver behind you
….but not in the one ahead of you.

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Statistics and averages are good for generalities, but quite often they do not apply to individuals.  For example, according to statistics and averages….if you put one hand on a hot stove and the other hand in a cold freezer….you should feel quite comfortable.
 
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Most ordinary people don’t mind seeing rich people spending hard-earned money.  What aggravates them is seeing rich people spending hardly-earned money.
Marilyn vos Savant

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It is amazing how complete is the delusion that beauty is goodness.
Leo Tolstoy

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All the people like us are We….and everyone else is They.
Rudyard Kipling

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   Long, long ago:

Baths consisted of a big tub filled with hot water.  The man of the house had the privilege of the nice clean water, then all the sons and other men, then the women and finally the children.  Last of all, the babies.  By then the water was so dirty you could actually lose someone in it.  Hence the saying, “DON’T THROW THE BABY OUT WITH THE BATH WATER!”

Houses had thatched roofs of thick straw piled high.  Since it was the only place for animals to get warm, all the cats and other small animals lived in the roof.  When it rained, the straw became slippery and sometimes the little animals would slip and fall off the roof.  Hence the saying, “IT’S RAINING CATS AND DOGS!”

Most houses had dirt floors.  Only the wealthy people had something other that dirt.  Hence the saying, “DIRT POOR.”

Food was cooked in a big pot that always hung over the fire in the kitchen.  Everyday, they lit the fire and added things to the pot.  They ate mostly vegetables and did not get much meat.  They would eat this stew for dinner, leaving leftovers in the pot to get cold overnight and then start over the next day.  Sometimes the stew had food in it that had been there for quite awhile.  Hence the rhyme, “PEAS PORRIDGE HOT, PEAS PORRIDGE COLD.  PEAS PORRIDGE IN THE POT NINE DAYS OLD.”

Sometimes people could obtain pork, which made them feel quite special.  When visitors came over, they would hang up their bacon to show it off.  It was a sign of wealth that a man could “BRING HOME THE BACON.”  They would cut off a little to share with guests and everyone would sit around and “CHEW THE FAT.”

Bread was divided according to status.  Household workers got the burnt bottom of the loaf, the family got the middle, and guests got the top, or the “UPPER CRUST.”

People would drink their ale or whisky from lead cups.  The chemical reaction would sometimes knock out heavy drinkers  for a couple of days.  The family would put that person on the kitchen table and everyone would gather around, eat and drink, and wait to see if the person would wake up.  Hence the custom of “HOLDING A WAKE.”

Doctors were scarce and sometimes people who were considered dead were put into a coffin and buried erroneously.  To prevent this mistake, a string would be attached to the person’s wrist.  The string would go through the coffin and up through the ground and be tied to a bell.  Then someone would have to sit in the graveyard all night on the “GRAVEYARD SHIFT” and listen for the bell.  Thus, the buried person could be “SAVED BY THE BELL” or was considered “A DEAD RINGER.”

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Upon returning to Italy from a trip to China in August of 1271, Jacob of Ancona reported that he heard the elderly scholars condemning young people for promiscuity, for homosexuality, for feminism, for being to lenient with criminals and above all, for being obsessed with making money.

 
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            Peace.
          It does not mean to be in a place where there is no noise, no trouble and no hard work.
It means to be in the midst of those things and still be calm in your heart.

   
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I’ve learned how hard I could work….if I liked what I was doing.
And how hard it was to work….if I didn’t.
Stephanie Salter